Global Warming Solutions

“We are the first generation to feel the sting of climate change, and we are the last generation that can do something about it.”

- Washington State Gov. Jay Inslee

The last generation

Years ago, many of us thought of global warming as something that would happen “someday.” As it turns out, “someday” is right now.

We’re fast approaching the point when scientists say climate change could tip toward catastrophe, with sea levels rising faster along our coasts, storms growing more powerful, and droughts and other forms of extreme weather more disruptive.

Credit: Leonard Zhukovsky/Bigstock

Of course, nobody wants to leave the next generation a world where heat waves, floods, droughts and worse are everyday events in an increasingly dangerous world.

If we accept, as we must, the broad scientific consensus that human pollution is accelerating these changes, then this is our challenge: stop putting carbon into the atmosphere, increase our energy efficiency, and repower our society with clean, renewable energy sources such as solar and wind.

The good news is that solutions like solar, wind and energy efficiency not only reduce carbon pollution. They also clean up our air, reduce asthma attacks, and promote energy independence.

 

Credit: Mavrick/Shutterstock

The actions the United States has taken to date are necessary — but not yet sufficient — to prevent a catastrophic rise in global temperatures. In order to keep global temperatures from rising more than 1.5°C — the international consensus target for preventing the worst consequences of warming — the U.S. must reach net zero emissions economy-wide by 2050.

Leaders at all levels of government across the United States must follow through with existing commitments to reduce pollution. Leaders at all levels of government should identify and pursue new policies to cut pollution. And the U.S. must play a leadership role in the global movement to limit global warming.

Credit: Staff

Protect our children's future

As Gov. Inslee pointed out, global warming is the challenge of our generation.

Protecting our children’s future requires us to stop dumping carbon into our atmosphere, and there’s no better place to start than with America’s No. 1 global warming polluters. 

Issue updates

News Release | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

Georgia cities highlighted in new report on solar power progress

Atlanta, GA - Atlanta has doubled its solar capacity in the last five years and is climbing in the rankings while Athens trails New York City for solar per capita. Results come from the seventh edition of Shining Cities:The Top U.S. Cities for Solar, a new report released today by Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center. It is the most comprehensive survey available of installed solar capacity in major U.S. cities.

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Report | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

Shining Cities 2020

America’s major cities have played a key role in the clean energy revolution and stand to reap tremendous benefits from solar energy. As population centers, they are major sources of electricity demand and, with millions of rooftops suitable for solar panels, they have the potential to be major sources of clean energy production as well.
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News Release | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

Renewable Energy 101 Highlights Clean Energy Leadership at Georgia Colleges

Atlanta, GA— Environment Georgia  released today “Renewable Energy 101”which details the ten major tools universities, local governments and the state could use to transition to 100% clean and renewable energy. The report presents examples from campuses across the state in categories such as recycling, energy efficiency, energy conservation, transportation and the implementation of renewable energies like geothermal and solar. 

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News Release | Environment Georgia

Clean Energy Wins on Election Day in Athens

Athens, GA--With 78.43% of voters in support, the Athens-Clarke County SPLOST package was overwhelming passed last night. Passage will allow Athens-Clarke Co. to move forward with a plan that will collect roughly $313 million over the next 11 years from a 1 cent sales tax increase. Included in the package presented to voters was over $15 million dollars for the local government to spend on energy efficiency improvements and renewable energy like rooftop solar. 

 

 

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News Release | Environment Georgia

Georgia Mayors Join National Coalition to Call for a Solar Energy Future

Decatur, Georgia - Georgia mayors representing 5 cities across our state have joined a list of over 300 cities across the U.S. in signing on to a letter calling for a future powered by more clean renewable solar power, released today by Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center. The group of “Mayors for Solar Energy” committed to this cause is bipartisan and represents cities of all sizes spanning all 50 states. 

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