News Releases

News Release | Environment Georgia

President Obama’s Climate Plan a Clear Victory for Georgia, Future Generations

Atlanta, GA – Today, President Obama announced a climate plan that will set limits on carbon pollution from power plants, advance energy efficiency, and increase the nation’s commitment to renewable energy. In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, downpours in Georgia, and wildfires in Colorado, the President’s plan to address global warming was loudly applauded by Environment Georgia and many others.

News Release | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

New report outlines vision for how Atlanta can become the South’s solar energy leader

Atlanta, GA—Environment Georgia Research and Policy Center today released a new report outlining Atlanta's huge potential to become the South's solar leader.

News Release | Environment Georgia

President Recommits to Tackling Global Warming in Inaugural Address

Atlanta  – Minutes ago, President Obama concluded his second inaugural address. State Advocate of Environment Georgia, Jennette Gayer, made the following statement in response: 

News Release | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

New Soot Standards will Save Lives

Atlanta, GA—Today the Obama administration strengthened air quality standards for particulate matter or “soot” pollution.  Soot pollution is the deadliest of the common air pollutants, causing thousands of premature deaths every year across the country through a variety of cardiovascular and respiratory illnesses.  It also contributes to haze that hangs over many of the country’s most scenic parks and wilderness areas.  Sources of soot pollution include power plants and diesel trucks and buses.  The strengthened standards, issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, outline how much soot pollution can be in the air and still be safe to breathe, and better reflect the latest scientific research.

News Release | Environment Georgia

A Fiscal Cliff for Wind Energy?

Atlanta, GA – Recent news highlighting low water levels in Lake Lanier have brought home the growing severity of the current drought in Georgia. While Gov. Deal has spent millions of dollars on reservoirs in recent months a new Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center Report has found that increased wind production around the country has already had a huge impact on the amount of water needed to cool traditional fossil fuel and nuclear power plants---the 120 million megawatt-hours (MWh) of wind electricity produced in 2011 saved 26 billion gallons of water, more than enough to meet the annual domestic use needs of a city the size of Boston.

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