News Releases

News Release | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

Georgia Water Coalition names 2014 “Dirty Dozen”

Today, Georgia’s leading water coalition named its “Dirty Dozen” for 2014, highlighting 12 of the worst offenses to Georgia’s waters. The annual Dirty Dozen shines a spotlight on threats to Georgia’s water resources as well as the polluters and state policies or failures that ultimately harm—or could harm—Georgia property owners, downstream communities, fish and wildlife, hunters and anglers, and boaters and swimmers. Environment Georgia successfully nominated efforts to derail the EPA’s proposed Clean Water Rule as one of the twelve major water problems Georgia faces.

News Release | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

Environment Georgia Urges Passage of a Strong Clean Power Plan

Comments delivered by Jennette Gayer, Director of Environment Georgia, to the EPA

News Release | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

New Report Shows Progress, Opportunities For Offshore Wind

Atlanta, Ga. (July 10, 2014) – A new report out today by the National Wildlife Federation outlines the significant progress made in the American offshore wind industry in recent years, and calls for leadership to fully realize the industry’s potential.

News Release | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

10 Million Pounds of Toxic Chemicals Dumped into Georgia’s Waterways

Savannah, GA--Industrial facilities dumped 10,132,268 pounds of toxic chemicals into Georgia’s waterways in 2012, making Georgia’s waterways the 8th worst in the nation according to a new report by Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center. The Savannah River and her tributaries received over 5 million pounds of toxic pollution making it the third worst in the country. 

News Release | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

EPA proposes first-ever limits on carbon pollution from power plants

Atlanta, GA – Today, the Environmental Protection Agency proposed the first-ever, federal limits on carbon pollution from power plants, the largest single source of global warming pollution in America. 

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