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Report | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

Star Power

Georgia could meet its energy needs by capturing just a sliver of the virtually limitless and pollution-free energy that strikes the state every day in the form of sunlight. With solar installation costs falling, the efficiency of solar cells rising, and the threats of air pollution and global warming ever-looming, solar power is becoming a more attractive and widespread source of energy every day.

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News Release | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

Report: 15 percent solar in reach

Savannah, GA –Solar power is growing so fast in Georgia that goals once considered ambitious are now seen as readily achievable, according to a new report by Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center. Cities like Savannah and Tybee are helping to lead the charge by implementing innovative new solar programs.

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News Release | Environment Georgia

Obama administration to put large stretches of Atlantic coastline, beaches at risk

Washington, D.C. -- Today the Obama administration proposed opening up huge swaths of the Atlantic Ocean to offshore drilling, putting large stretches of the nation’s coastline, including some of its most beloved beaches from Virginia to Georgia, at risk of a devastating spill.

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News Release | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

Wind Energy Could Reduce Pollution Equivalent to Half a Million Cars in Georgia

Savannah, GA -- The carbon pollution equivalent to over 500,000 cars could be eliminated in Georgia if wind power continues its recent growth trajectory, according to a new analysis by Environment Georgia. 

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Report | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

More Wind, Less Warming

If America were to take advantage of just a frac- tion of its wind energy potential to get 30 percent of its electricity from the wind by 2030, the nation could cut carbon emissions from power plants to 40 percent below 2005 levels. That much wind power would help states meet and exceed the carbon dioxide emission reductions called for

by the Environmental Protection Agency’s draft Clean Power Plan, and help the nation meet its commitment to cut U.S. carbon pollution by 26 to 28 percent by 2025. 

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